Diagonals

Diagonals

Diagonals

The diagonal method is one of the rules of composition in photography, painting and graphics including WEDDING CINEMATOGRAPHY NYC. While examining numerous photographs, paintings, and prints, photographer Edwin Westhoff accidentally discovered that the details of the images that get the most attention lie on the diagonal at an angle of 45°. However, depending on the aspect ratio of the frame, this angle may vary.

A photo with a diagonal element is almost always more dynamic and powerful than the same photo without it. If verticals and horizontals usually divide space into regions, then diagonals connect it and continuously guide the viewer’s eye through the entire frame.

There can be two diagonals in a frame:

“fast” – from the upper left to the lower right corner;
“slow” – from the lower left to the upper right corner.

The visual perception of the brain is associated with diagonals: we are used to reading from left to right and from top to bottom, descending diagonally. Accordingly, objects located diagonally are easier and faster to perceive by the visual center.

Psychologists believe that the “slow”, ascending diagonal causes appeasement, while the “fast”, descending diagonal causes anxiety and anxiety. Keep this in mind when building a composition.